Usability Fedora vs Windows

I’m writing this post sitting in a train, connected to the internet via UMTS. The device is a Huawai E220 HSDPA modem connected via USB. Guess who is the winner?

Procedure to get the device running on Fedora (first time usage):

  • Plug in the device on any USB port
  • Enter the PIN in the pop-up
  • Enjoy mobile Internet connection

Steps: 3
Time: approx. 5sec.

Procedure on Windows XP (first time usage):

  • Decide on what USB port you will plug in the device an memorize it, because subsequently it will only work on that USB port
  • Plug in the device
  • A virtual CDROM drive gets mounted, a window with some drivers is appearing
  • Install the driver
  • reboot your notebook
  • Finding and starting the previously installed software
  • Getting a pop-up asking for the PIN
  • Enjoy mobile Internet connection

Steps: 8
Time: approx 10min

[update]
Procedure on Windows 7 (first time usage):

  • Decide on what USB port you will plug in the device an memorize it, because subsequently it will only work on that USB port
  • Plug in the device
  • A virtual CDROM drive gets mounted, a window with some drivers is appearing
  • When autorun.inf is enabled, the driver installs automatically (on enterprise systems mostly disabled). if not enabled, read some documentation what to do
  • Finding and starting the previously installed software
  • Getting a pop-up asking for the PIN
  • Enjoy mobile Internet connection

Steps: 7
Time: Between 5min and 30min (depending on your Windows 7 knowledge)
[/update]

For the subsequent usage on Fedora proceed as it is the first time usage.

On Windows (XP and 7) you need to remember which port you plugged in the device when you installed it. Otherwise you need to uninstall the drivers, reboot and install the drivers again and reboot again. [update]On Windows 7 you do not need a reboot.[/update]

Having fun? With Fedora yes ๐Ÿ™‚ With Windows? Not really…

Spacewalk 1.2 released -> PostgreSQL Support quite ready -> First analysis

Today, Spacewalk – the upstream project of the RHN satellite – released version 1.2. One of the promises the developers made was better support of PostgreSQL. It seems that lot of stuff is now working. As I promised, I’m going to examine whats working and whats not. I’ll file every single bug I’ll find, please do the same in a polite manner.

First impression
Installation and first sync of yum channels works like PostgreSQL support was there from the first second. Nevertheless, there is still a lot to test.

How to install Spacewalk with PostgreSQL?
It is straight forward:

  • Set up a PostgreSQL database as described here
  • Follow and exclude things that mentions Oracle
  • Go for the the instructions about PostgreSQL.

And enjoy your newly installed Spacewalk server w/o Oracle!

What I proofed working so far:

  • Installing with PostgreSQL went smooth and much faster than the stuff with an Oracle setup
  • Creating a CentOS5 Channel
  • Add a yum repository (i.e.mirror.switch.ch)
  • Linking the yum repo to a channel

Conclusion so far

  • Spacewalk feels (not measured) MUCH (very much) faster with PostgreSQL. (Feels like more than the tripple speed)
  • PostgreSQL support seems to be almost ready for production (the tested stuff)
  • As RHN Satellite 5.4 is out now and the ISS bug is fixed (in spacewalk-nightly, not yet with an erratum) Red Hat should and can now focus on the complete replacement of the Oracle embedded DB.
  • RHN Satellite 6.0 can and should be released w/o being bound to Oracle

More things to test

Since syncing repos is a time consuming task (seems to be much less time consuming with PostgreSQL), some tests are still pending. There is no single System yet subscribed, no deployment tests etc. I’ll test them later and let you know.

Some more words to say

The RHN Satellite and Spacewalk developer crew (once again) made an outstanding good job (I wish I could say the same on QA). At FUDCon 2010 in Zurich, Miroslav stated that nobody is willing to test the PostgreSQL support. No wonder it was not yet ready to test it at that time. Now, PostgreSQL enabled Spacewalk is ready for being tested by broad public , do it as I do it!

Having fun? Yes sure, I’m going to do some more intensive tests on the PostgreSQL support.

Cheers,

Luc

RHEL6 is released!

rhel6 @rhn.redhat.com

RHEL6 @rhn.redhat.com

RHEL6 was just released at 2010-11-10 20:09:50 CET. Quoting Red Hat press relase: Today, we delivered Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 to the market. @Red Hat: you are so mean! Next time inform your fellows one day in advance to give your fellows the chance to fill the fridges with champagne!

I did not checked (yet) the differences between beta 2.1 and GA. I guess the differences are at a minimum.

The odd thing is: It seems not be available via satellite-sync yet (yes, sat540 is in place).

[update]You need to get a new certificate from Red Hat support to get access to the rhel6 channels, regardless if you got one a few days ago to install sat540.[/update]

Having fun? No, I do not have any champagne in my fridge ๐Ÿ˜‰

Joining the Fedora doc and trans-de Teams

The history
Since 1994 I’m a Linux enthusiast. In the year 2000 I was installing the first commercially used Linux Systems in Switzerland’s airline industry. Since then I worked in different companies mostly in the outsourcing business.

From 2001 to 2003 I was also contributing some German translations for KDE, as well as writing two Docbook SGML documentation for TLDP.

The current
Since approx. two years I’m working mostly with Red Hat’s RHEL and its derivatives such as CentOS. Later I also switched my desktop and notebooks from openSUSE to Fedora, for obvious reasons: Fedora is the upstream of RHEL and it is more stable.

I’m also a guy that wrote and writes some Bugzilla entries, mostly for RHN Satellite/Spacewalk. Those guys may already know me, I’ll hope they still like me ๐Ÿ˜‰

First contact to the Fedora community
My first contact with the Fedora community was at FUDCon 2010 in Zรผrich, Switzerland, my home town. There I recognized that it is indeed a very nice and international community with a lot of interesting people.

This encouraged me to to something for the Fedora project. What can I do? First of all, I’m having some knowledge about technical documentations, thus joining the doc-team. I also have some experience with GNU gettext and my mother tongue is german, so joining the trans-de team makes sense.

The future
I’m a RHCE with some skills in building RPMs, lets see if I can help the project with that too.

Lets have some fun?
Always!